Thursday, June 18, 2015

Null-aware operators and generalized tear-offs in Dart

Yesterday, on June 17, 2015, the 109th Ecma General Assembly approved the ECMA-408 3rd edition - Dart Programming Language Specification.



Main additions to the 3rd edition of the spec are

  1. null-aware operators and 
  2. generalized tear-offs

Null-aware operators are currently being implemented and tear-offs will follow.

The standard has been published on the Ecma Website.

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Dart is now on GitHub

Dart is an open-source programming language, with contributors working on the language, libraries, tools, and packages. To make working with our community even easier, today we are announcing that we've fully settled into our new home on GitHub. We invite you to follow along and contribute at https://github.com/dart-lang.


The Dart SDK now has its own repository, joining the numerous Dart tools and packages already in our GitHub org. We’ve moved all the SDK issues over (keeping the original issue numbers!), and dartbug.com now points to GitHub's issue tracker for the Dart SDK.

Getting the SDK source is easy, and we've documented the contribution workflow. Our development tools are optimized for code reviews on Rietveld, Chromium's code review system, and they make it easy to start a review and cleanly land a patch. For very small patches, contributors can use a standard GitHub pull request.

One of the easiest ways to start contributing to Dart is to work on one of our packages. Individual packages (for example, args, http, and test) now have their own repos, complete with their own issue trackers and buildbots. To get started, check them out and find issues marked "help wanted". And of course, we encourage everyone to continue filing issues with dartbug.com.

We hope our move to GitHub helps more Dartisans become active participants in the future of Dart.

Monday, May 11, 2015

Dart Developer Summit videos now available

Dart developers met in San Francisco for two days in April 2015 to share stories, meet engineers, and learn about how to deploy Dart for the web, server, and mobile. If you missed the event, don't worry. You can now watch all the Dart Developer Summit presentations on YouTube.



Check out the playlist to see a wide range of content: case studies, insight into new features and libraries (such as async/await), a game engine built with Dart, deploying Dart to Internet of Things, deploying Dart on the server, using Dart in Google, and much more.

We also saw two new interesting experiments to bring Dart to mobile: the Dart for Mobile Services project and the Sky project.

A big thank you to everyone that joined us in person and on the live stream. We hope you enjoy the videos, and we'll see you in the Dartiverse!

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Announcing DartPad: A friction-free way to explore Dart code

We believe developers deserve a fast iteration cycle, immediate feedback, and zero-install tools as they explore languages and APIs. To help both new and experienced Dart developers, today we are announcing DartPad 1.0, a friction-free way to try Dart code and APIs in your browser.

Developers new to Dart can use DartPad to experience the language and libraries. Experienced Dart developers will find DartPad the easiest way to experiment with the core APIs and learn new patterns and idioms. Everyone can use DartPad to share snippets of Dart code.

DartPad supports the full Dart language, the core libraries, and even HTML/CSS.



Easily discover APIs with DartPad's support for code completion.


Quickly find issues in your code with real-time errors and warnings.


Learn more about APIs with real-time docs.


Easily share your Dart code with DartPad's integration with Github's Gists.


We hope developers will find DartPad a useful tool. We're just getting started, and we appreciate any feedback. If you're curious how we built DartPad using open-source tools and workflows, check out our video presentation from the Dart Developer Summit.

- Luke Church and Devon Carew, Friction Fighters

Thursday, April 30, 2015

The present and future of editors and IDEs for Dart

When we started the Dart project in 2011, we challenged ourselves to deliver a structured and lightweight language that can be supported with productive editors and tools. To bootstrap the tooling ecosystem for Dart, we built Dart Editor to explore how to make Dart developers productive with code completion, source navigation, and static analysis.

Today, there are more editing and IDE options for a Dart developer than ever before. Developers are using a range of command-line tools, text editors, and full IDEs that support Dart. In what comes as no surprise, we've found that developers have very strong affinities to their particular editors, and that one size does not fit all. We've also learned that many developers are outgrowing Dart Editor, as they require source control support, plugins, extended customizability, and more.

To that end, we've shifted our strategy from focusing on a single Java-based editor, to focusing on low-level tools, the Dart Analysis Server, and plugins for editors. We are retiring Dart Editor at the Dart 1.11 release. WebStorm is the preferred IDE experience for Dart, and the Eclipse plugin for Dart will continue to be supported.

WebStorm and IntelliJ are full-featured IDEs, and both ship with the Dart plugin. The Dart plugin uses the Dart Analysis Server for its errors, warnings, quick fixes, and more. JetBrains editors have a robust plugin ecosystem, strong support for numerous languages and libraries, and are very customizable. Learn more about the various WebStorm editions and licenses, or download a WebStorm trial.

The Dart plugin for Sublime has strong community support, and is great for developers looking for a lightweight text editing experience for Dart. It now displays real-time errors and warnings from the Dart Analysis Server. It also supports numerous build commands (for dart2js, pub, etc.), syntax highlighting, and more.

We built DartPad for developers that want a friction-free introduction to the Dart language and libraries. DartPad, also based on the Dart Analysis Server, is perfect for dabbling in Dart, sharing snippets, answering Dart questions on StackOverflow, and exploring Dart APIs.

Another option is the Eclipse plugin for Dart, which we continue to support. The Eclipse plugin, which currently shares most of its code with Dart Editor, is powered by the Dart Analysis Server.

Server-side Dart developers can use Observatory for profiling, debugging, insights, and more. Observatory isn't an editor or IDE, but its real-time VM stats and debugger are a great complement to your editor.

The tooling ecosystem for Dart has come a long way. Stay productive!

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Live analysis results with WebStorm 10 and Dart

Today, JetBrains announced the new WebStorm 10 release, which includes significant enhancements for the Dart developer. The new version adds live analysis feedback, and fixes many reported issues. We highly recommend that all WebStorm users upgrade, and that new Dart developers who want a full-featured IDE try the new WebStorm 10 release.



WebStorm now provides on-the-fly code analysis results for Dart code, powered by the Dart Analysis server. You can quickly look through the list of warnings and errors in your project in a tool window or see them highlighted right in the editor.



WebStorm can now auto-import new libraries into your Dart code. Simply press Control-Space twice, and you will see a list of all libraries that are available. Select the library you want to use, and WebStorm automatically adds the necessary import statement to the top of the file.

You can use Dart's new async/await and generator features in WebStorm 10. Asynchronous code is now easier to write and understand, and the new language features make generating Streams and iterators much easier.

Also included in WebStorm 10 are numerous fixes and enhancements for formatting, code completion, code navigation, documentation, and more.

You can learn more about what's new in WebStorm 10, and download WebStorm 10 to create a new client or server Dart project. We hope you enjoy WebStorm's powerful Dart and web development capabilities.

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Dart 1.9: The release you’ve been await-ing for

Asynchronous programming is everywhere – user interaction, network access, file I/O. Dart simplifies and enhances these scenarios with the 1.9 release.

Today’s release introduces async methods and await expressions built on top of our existing Future API. You can now use familiar control flow features – for/while loops, if blocks, and try/catch – to manage complex asynchronous interactions. These new features are explained thoroughly the Dart Language Asynchrony Support: Phase 1 article.

Before

Dart’s Future API makes it easier to compose asynchronous operations, but handling conditional cases and errors can still be difficult.

After

async and await make implementing the same functionality straightforward.

We are also introducing generator methods – sync* and async* – that make it easy to lazily generate sequences, eliminating almost all cases where developers need to create custom iterators or manually manage stream creation. For more information, read the Asynchrony Support: Phase 2 article.

For a high-level overview of all of these new features, take a look at the Asynchrony section of the Dart Language Tour.

In addition to async, Dart 1.9 includes a number of other enhancements.

  • enum, a long-requested feature, is now fully supported.
  • The Dart Analyzer has moved to the Dart Analysis Server. This makes it much easier to integrate Dart source analysis into IDE’s beyond the Dart Editor (for instance, IntelliJ and Sublime).
  • We've updated the regular expression engine for the Dart VM. It's up to 150x faster than the previous implementation.
  • The Isolate API has now been fully implemented in the Dart VM, making it much easier to create applications that target multiple CPUs.

For a full list of the changes in this release, take a look at the release notes.

Visit the Dart download page to get started with Dart 1.9. Check out the Dart support page for information on getting help, filing issues, and contributing to the project.