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Flutter IntelliJ plugin v18: Android Studio support

Android Studio supportYou can now install the Flutter plugin into Android Studio, and create, edit, and run your Flutter apps there. The plugin requires at least Android Studio 3.0 (currently at Android Studio 3.0 Preview beta 7). As this is the first Flutter plugin release to support Android Studio it should be considered beta; your feedback will help us improve the integration.


Improved support for developing and consuming Flutter pluginsFor this release we worked on improving the support for developing and consuming Flutter plugins. In addition to minor fixes and workflow improvements, we show referenced Flutter plugins in the ‘External Libraries’ part of the project view. From here, it’s easy to dig into the native iOS and Android implementations of a plugin, if desired.

Reload on save is now the default behaviorThe ‘hot reload on save’ feature is now enabled by default. When running an app, hitting save or pressing the save keyboard shortcut will trigger a hot reload. Thanks for yo…
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Dart 2.0 pre-releases: What they mean to you

If you publish Dart packages or like to use early releases of the Dart SDK, the next few months are going to be interesting, as apps and packages adapt to the changes required by Dart 2.0. To make the process smoother, the pub tool that’s in Dart 2.0 pre-releases allows developers to download (and attempt to use) packages that don’t explicitly support Dart 2.0. The upshot: Use a stable Dart SDK if you need reliability. Use a pre-release Dart 2.0 SDK if you’d like to test published packages with Dart 2.0. Report any issues you find to the package maintainer. If you publish packages, be careful about SDK constraints, and expect feedback from developers trying your packages with Dart 2.0. The Dart 2.0 update page has all the details, but here’s an overview of what to expect, based on your development environment and the kind of code you write. If you use Flutter: In the short term, your Flutter code isn’t affected. When Flutter updates its Dart SDK to a Dart 2.0 pre-release, the Flutter…

AngularDart 4

AngularDart v4 is now available. We've been busy since the release angular2 v3.1.0 in May. Not only did we "drop the 2", but we also improved the compiler and tightened up the framework to give you smaller code, we updated the package structure to improve usability, and we added several new features. Check out the updated documentation to get started.
Just angular Upgrading to v4 will require more than updating your version constraint. The package has changed names (back) to angular – dropping the 2. You'll need to update your pubspec.yaml and the corresponding imports in your code. In most instances, find-and-replace should do the trick. Going forward, the package will be called package:angular. We'll just update the version number.
Smaller code The updated compiler in 4.0 allows type-based optimizations that not only improve runtime performance but generate better code because we are able to strongly type templates. A big result of the update is that many ap…

Flutter IntelliJ plugin v17.0: Hot reload on save and improved project wizard

Hot reload on save
By request, we now support doing a hot reload on file save. On an explicit save (cmd-s / ctrl-s or File > Save All), if there’s an app currently running we will try to reload changes into that app. This integrates well with how IntelliJ’s save action works — the default behavior of the action maps to a save-all command.

If there are analysis errors on save, instead of reloading we will highlight errors in the analysis view.

This behavior is off by default and can be turned on in Settings > Languages & Frameworks > Flutter. Feedback on this feature is much appreciated and will help us make additional improvements to the workflow. In particular, should we enable this feature by default?
Improved project wizardWe’ve updated the new project wizard! You can now choose which type of Flutter project to create: an app, a plugin project – to expose native services, or a package – to create a reusable Dart library. In addition, you can choose between generating a project…

Getting your apps ready for Dart 2.0

One of the most important features for Dart 2.0, strong mode, has been available for several releases. Migrate to strong mode now to take advantage of the new sound type system that finds errors at compile time (rather than letting your users discover them). You may even find bugs that have been lurking in your code. If you are using Flutter, it already uses strong mode, so you have met this requirement. Strong mode is the primary breaking change for 2.0, but there are likely to be other updates. For more information, see Dart 2.0 Updates.

Flutter IntelliJ plugin v16.0: Testing and app launching!

New testing supportWe’ve added the ability to run individual Flutter tests via actions in the editor’s gutter:

And now support running Flutter’s widget tests; see https://flutter.io/testing/#widget-testing.
Project structureWe re-worked how we define Flutter project and module types in IntelliJ. This addresses a few outstanding issues and will let us more easily go into more IntelliJ based products in the future. The next time you open an existing project with the new version of the plugin, you’ll see a one-time ‘module type updated’ message:

Launching improvementsThis release sports several improvements to app launching: Launch your app in profile and release modes (available via the ‘Run’ menu) Start Android emulators from the device dropdown; this requires the Android AVDs to have been already created in something like Android Studio Tweaks to when the run and reload buttons are enabled

For more detailed info on the version 16.0 release, see our project plan, or the

Announcing DartConf

We’re aflutter to announce the official Dart conference in Los Angeles on January 23-24, 2018. The event will be even bigger and better than last year, with exciting talks about Dart 2.0, Flutter, Dart Dev Compiler, AngularDart, and much more.


We’re moving the annual conference from October to January for two reasons:
We want our speakers to be available for the other conferences that are happening in the Fall. Each year, September to November is full of events where the team can reach developers unaware of the awesomeness of all things Dart.Likewise, we don’t want you to have to choose between DartConf and other great events. Lots of new things are coming to Dart in the new year.Place: Google Los Angeles
Time: January 23-24, 2018
Pre-registration: [CLICK HERE]

The event will be live-streamed and sessions will be recorded. Ask questions at dartconf-questions@googlegroups.com.


Flutter IntelliJ plugin version 15.0: Improved project creation and support for flutter test

Flutter test support!
We now support running and debugging ‘flutter test’ tests! Right click on your Flutter tests in the test/ directory, and choose the ‘Run’ or ‘Debug’ option:



The results are displayed in the standard IntelliJ test runner. The support for this just recently landed in Flutter’s alpha channel, so you don’t see support for it in IntelliJ, you may want to run ‘flutter upgrade’. Happy testing!



Improved project creationWhen creating a new Flutter project, you now have the option of installing the Flutter SDK from the new project wizard. This will help new users get started – they can create their first Flutter project without having to make a detour to the command line. In addition, we’ve improved the error reporting on project creation failures.



Reload feedback improvementsBased on user feedback, we’ve made some improvements to the UI for hot reload. When clicking the hot reload button (or using the reload key binding), we disable the hot reload button during the course o…

A stronger Dart for everyone

We are constantly asking ourselves:
How do we make developers even more productive when writing Dart apps? We believe that a critical part of the answer to this question is to make strongmode – a sound static type system for Dart – the standard for all Dart developers.

Teams that use Dart to build apps like Soundtrap, AdWords, AdSense, and Greentea say they really enjoy using strong mode features, such as early error detection. In fact, teams that have switched completely to strong mode cite not only early error detection but also better code readability and maintainability as major benefits. We hear this both from small teams and Рeven more so Рfrom large teams with hundreds of developers writing and maintaining millions of lines of Dart code. As Björn Sperber from Soundtrap says,
Strong mode and the smooth integration with IntelliJ is a joy to use and a huge improvement. If you’ve tried out Flutter, you’ve already used strong mode checks from the Dart analyzer.

Given the benefits …

Unboxing Packages: A Requiem for scheduled_test

Long long ago in the dawning days of Dart, when Futures were new and Streams unknown, Bob saw the need for a package manager to bring the people together. Together he and I spun formless bits into code and wove that code into pub, which even today carries code into the eager hands of Dartisans. In those olden days, we had no modern marvels such as the twins async and await, and our tests grew heavy and graceless under the weight of their chain()s1.So it was that I came up with an idea for a new way of writing tests. Instead of gluing the steps together with the cumbersome Future API, each step would register an asynchronous callback in a queue. Once all the steps were queued up, the library would run them in order. All the API boilerplate would be hidden away from the user, and the tests would look nice and clean. After honing this technique on pub’s tests, I brought it out into its own package, which I called scheduled_test.If this whole idea of queuing up tasks and running them late…

Dart 1.24: Faster edit-refresh cycle on the web & new function type syntax

Dart 1.24 is now available. It includes the Dart Development Compiler and supports a new generic function type syntax. Get it now!


Figure 1: DDC debugging in Chrome.

Some notable changes in this release:
pub serve now has support for the Dart Development Compiler. Unlike dart2js, this new compiler is modular, which allows pub to do incremental re-builds for pub serve.In practice what that means is you can edit your Dart files, refresh in Chrome (or other supported browsers), and see your edits almost immediately. This is because pub is only recompiling your package, not all packages that you depend on.There is one caveat with the new compiler, which is that your package and your dependencies must all be strong mode clean.You can also use the new compiler to run your tests in Chrome much more quickly than you can with dart2js.Read more in the changelog.You can now publish packages that depend on the Flutter SDK to pub. Moreover, pub.dartlang.org has started tagging Flutter plugins with …