Skip to main content

Aqueduct - a server-side web framework written in Dart

On the Dart summit last month, Joe Conway gave a great talk about Aqueduct, a server-side web framework written in Dart by stable|kernel. We asked Sarah from stable|kernel to write a blogpost as well. — Filip Hráček



After spending a year building Aqueduct in a relative vacuum, the stable|kernel team went into the Dart Summit with a lot excitement! Finally, we got to share our server-side web framework with the community it was built for: web and mobile developers who want to build an entire stack in Dart. If you missed stable|kernel CEO Joe Conway present Aqueduct at the Dart Summit, you can watch it here.

Our team began exploring Dart about 18 months ago and we quickly realized the potential for supercharging our team’s productivity due to Dart’s power and speed. In October 2015 Joe wrote: “It is important to us and our clients that we use platforms that allow for a high degree of productivity, testability and maintainability. In order to identify a platform that we could become experts in that also delivered on these three things, we set out to evaluate the web server platform landscape and find a platform that fit our needs.”

What appealed to us most about Dart:
  • Easily deployable, stand-alone virtual machine
  • An incredible set of libraries for building web servers
  • Asynchronous programming and reflection
  • A simple, elegant language that Swift, Objective-C and Java programmers would love

While Dart had all of the fundamentals and a great standard library to support building web server applications, no one had built a cohesive tool like Ruby on Rails, or .NET and the Entity framework. We were looking to combine the productivity of tools like those with the Dart platform together for a the ultimate programming experience. So that’s where Aqueduct comes in.

The purpose of Aqueduct is to provide a foundation to build full-stack solutions quickly, but without sacrificing long-term sustainability. All of the typical features necessary for a web server application are available out of the box.

Some of the highlights:
  • Easy integration with CI tools
  • OAuth 2.0 Implementation and Endpoints
  • Logging
  • An ORM that makes writing queries more productive, but doesn’t get in your way.
  • Automatic OpenAPI specification generation
  • High quality documentation to quickly get the most out of Aqueduct
  • Tooling for database migration

You can take a look at additional features here and check out the tutorials here.

— Sarah Woodward, stable|kernel

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Const, Static, Final, Oh my!

Posted by Seth Ladd

(This is an "oldie but a goodie" misc@dartlang.org post originally written by Bob Nystrom. It is being posted here as the explanations still ring true.)

Bob writes:


"static", "final", and "const" mean entirely distinct things in Dart:

"static" means a member is available on the class itself instead of on instances of the class. That's all it means, and it isn't used for anything else. static modifies *members*.

"final" means single-assignment: a final variable or field *must* have an initializer. Once assigned a value, a final variable's value cannot be changed. final modifies *variables*.

"const" has a meaning that's a bit more complex and subtle in Dart. const modifies *values*. You can use it when creating collections, like const [1, 2, 3], and when constructing objects (instead of new) like const Point(2, 3). Here, const means that the object's entire deep state can be determ…

The new AdWords UI uses Dart — we asked why

Google just announced a re-designed AdWords experience. In case you’re not familiar with AdWords: businesses use it to advertise on google.com and partner websites. Advertising makes up majority of Google’s revenue, so when Google decides to completely redo the customer-facing front end to it, it’s a big deal. The Dart team is proud to say that this new front end is built with Dart and Angular 2. Whenever you asked us whether Google is ‘even using Dart for anything,’ this is what we had in mind but couldn’t say aloud. Until now. We asked Joshy Joseph, the primary technical lead on the project, some questions. Joshy is focusing on things like infrastructure, application latency and development velocity, so he’s the right person to ask about Dart.Q: What exactly did we launch on Monday?It’s a complete redesign of the AdWords customer experience that is rolling out slowly as a test to a small initial set of advertisers. The most noticeable thing is probably the Material Design look and f…

Dart 1.12 Released, with Null-Aware Operators and more

Dart 1.12.0 is now released! It contains the new null-aware operators language feature, and enhancements to pub, Observatory, dartdoc, and much more.

Null-aware operators

The new null-aware operators help you reduce the amount of code required to work with references that are potentially null. This feature is a collection of syntactic sugar for traversing (potentially null) object calls, conditionally setting a variable, and evaluating two (potentially null) expressions.

Click or tap the red Run button below to see them in action.

??

  if null operator. `expr1 ?? expr2` evaluates to `expr1` if not `null`, otherwise `expr2`.


??=

  null-aware assignment. `v ??= expr` causes `v` to be assigned `expr` only if `v` is `null`.

x?.p

  null-aware access. `x?.p` evaluates to `x.p` if `x` is not `null`, otherwise evaluates to `null`.

x?.m()

  null-aware method invocation. `x?.m()` invokes `m` only if `x` is not `null`.

Learn more about Dart's null-aware operators in our Language Tour.

.packages fi…